Commissioned for World Health Day 2018 to document increased access to health care in the predominantly rural and indigenous region of Quiché, Guatemala. Photos were featured in a public campaign across public transport stations in Guatemala City.   Photo: Doña Juana, an indigenous Ixil midwife of Pulay, Quiché, Guatemala.

Commissioned for World Health Day 2018 to document increased access to health care in the predominantly rural and indigenous region of Quiché, Guatemala. Photos were featured in a public campaign across public transport stations in Guatemala City.

Photo: Doña Juana, an indigenous Ixil midwife of Pulay, Quiché, Guatemala.

 Women in a rural village of Quiché, Guatemala wait to hear a talk on maternal health, child nutrition, family planning and domestic violence led by a collaboration between WHO staff and the Guatemalan Ministry of Health.

Women in a rural village of Quiché, Guatemala wait to hear a talk on maternal health, child nutrition, family planning and domestic violence led by a collaboration between WHO staff and the Guatemalan Ministry of Health.

 A pregnant mother receives her first ultrasound during a consultation in a small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Guatemala.

A pregnant mother receives her first ultrasound during a consultation in a small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Guatemala.

 At a small health center in a village outside of Nebaj, a boy is weighed and measured at a monthly check-up for children who have been identified as malnourished, undernourished, or at high risk.

At a small health center in a village outside of Nebaj, a boy is weighed and measured at a monthly check-up for children who have been identified as malnourished, undernourished, or at high risk.

 A woman returning from the fields in Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

A woman returning from the fields in Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

 Ana Marteo, her two children, and her mother, Rosa, in the waiting room of the CAP Chajul, Quiché.

Ana Marteo, her two children, and her mother, Rosa, in the waiting room of the CAP Chajul, Quiché.

 Indigenous mothers in Quiché, Guatemala receive a lecture on vaccination before making a decision on whether to vaccinate their 11-year old daughters against HPV.

Indigenous mothers in Quiché, Guatemala receive a lecture on vaccination before making a decision on whether to vaccinate their 11-year old daughters against HPV.

 An indigenous girl receives a HPV vaccine at a public school in

An indigenous girl receives a HPV vaccine at a public school in

 Children identified as high-risk for malnutrition and undernutrition wait for a monthly check-up in the small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Quiché.

Children identified as high-risk for malnutrition and undernutrition wait for a monthly check-up in the small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Quiché.

 The rural landscape of Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

The rural landscape of Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

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 Commissioned for World Health Day 2018 to document increased access to health care in the predominantly rural and indigenous region of Quiché, Guatemala. Photos were featured in a public campaign across public transport stations in Guatemala City.   Photo: Doña Juana, an indigenous Ixil midwife of Pulay, Quiché, Guatemala.
 Women in a rural village of Quiché, Guatemala wait to hear a talk on maternal health, child nutrition, family planning and domestic violence led by a collaboration between WHO staff and the Guatemalan Ministry of Health.
 A pregnant mother receives her first ultrasound during a consultation in a small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Guatemala.
 At a small health center in a village outside of Nebaj, a boy is weighed and measured at a monthly check-up for children who have been identified as malnourished, undernourished, or at high risk.
 A woman returning from the fields in Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.
 Ana Marteo, her two children, and her mother, Rosa, in the waiting room of the CAP Chajul, Quiché.
 Indigenous mothers in Quiché, Guatemala receive a lecture on vaccination before making a decision on whether to vaccinate their 11-year old daughters against HPV.
 An indigenous girl receives a HPV vaccine at a public school in
 Children identified as high-risk for malnutrition and undernutrition wait for a monthly check-up in the small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Quiché.
 The rural landscape of Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.
1P9A5107.jpg
1P9A4949.jpg
1P9A5130 3.jpg
1P9A6523.jpg
1P9A6802.jpg

Commissioned for World Health Day 2018 to document increased access to health care in the predominantly rural and indigenous region of Quiché, Guatemala. Photos were featured in a public campaign across public transport stations in Guatemala City.

Photo: Doña Juana, an indigenous Ixil midwife of Pulay, Quiché, Guatemala.

Women in a rural village of Quiché, Guatemala wait to hear a talk on maternal health, child nutrition, family planning and domestic violence led by a collaboration between WHO staff and the Guatemalan Ministry of Health.

A pregnant mother receives her first ultrasound during a consultation in a small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Guatemala.

At a small health center in a village outside of Nebaj, a boy is weighed and measured at a monthly check-up for children who have been identified as malnourished, undernourished, or at high risk.

A woman returning from the fields in Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

Ana Marteo, her two children, and her mother, Rosa, in the waiting room of the CAP Chajul, Quiché.

Indigenous mothers in Quiché, Guatemala receive a lecture on vaccination before making a decision on whether to vaccinate their 11-year old daughters against HPV.

An indigenous girl receives a HPV vaccine at a public school in

Children identified as high-risk for malnutrition and undernutrition wait for a monthly check-up in the small health clinic of a rural community outside Nebaj, Quiché.

The rural landscape of Quiché, Guatemala. Access to health care for the small, indigenous communities in this region is often limited to, at the most, a small, understaffed and under-equipped center of health. Hospitals can be anywhere from 45 minutes to several hours’ journey away.

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