Commissioned to document World Health Organization’s work in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.  Work still in progress.

Commissioned to document World Health Organization’s work in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Work still in progress.

 A nurse at a traveling clinic provides HPV vaccinations to 10-year-old girls at a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

A nurse at a traveling clinic provides HPV vaccinations to 10-year-old girls at a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

 A patient awaits the results of her biopsy in a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

A patient awaits the results of her biopsy in a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

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 Patients line out the door by as early as 6:00 at public hospitals in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, awaiting treatment. Many travel upwards of two hours to receive medical attention.

Patients line out the door by as early as 6:00 at public hospitals in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, awaiting treatment. Many travel upwards of two hours to receive medical attention.

 A doctor at a small clinic in Tegucigalpa prepares a sample for testing to determine whether the patient’s cancer has grown or been eradicated over her treatment. Due to the stigma against cervical cancer widespread in Central America, clinics face difficulties getting patients to return for treatment, leading to an increased incidence of cancer in patients where it could have been prevented.

A doctor at a small clinic in Tegucigalpa prepares a sample for testing to determine whether the patient’s cancer has grown or been eradicated over her treatment. Due to the stigma against cervical cancer widespread in Central America, clinics face difficulties getting patients to return for treatment, leading to an increased incidence of cancer in patients where it could have been prevented.

 A medical team examines the cancerous lesions on a 21-year-old pregnant patient at a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

A medical team examines the cancerous lesions on a 21-year-old pregnant patient at a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

 A lecture on women’s health and the importance of getting cervical examinations is provided by hospital staff to patients in the waiting rooms every morning.

A lecture on women’s health and the importance of getting cervical examinations is provided by hospital staff to patients in the waiting rooms every morning.

 Nurses equipped with HPV vaccines pose for a portrait in the entrance to a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Nurses equipped with HPV vaccines pose for a portrait in the entrance to a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

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 Dozens of samples await testing at a hospital laboratory in Tegucigalpa. A lack of vaccination and access to health education and care has led cervical cancer to rank as the number one cause of death to women in Central America.

Dozens of samples await testing at a hospital laboratory in Tegucigalpa. A lack of vaccination and access to health education and care has led cervical cancer to rank as the number one cause of death to women in Central America.

 A pregnant patient in the waiting room of the gynecology department of a government hospital in Tegucigalpa. Due to her pregnancy, the patient cannot be treated for her cancer and will have to wait until her child’s birth at which point the cancer can spread more drastically.

A pregnant patient in the waiting room of the gynecology department of a government hospital in Tegucigalpa. Due to her pregnancy, the patient cannot be treated for her cancer and will have to wait until her child’s birth at which point the cancer can spread more drastically.

1P9A7292.jpg
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1P9A7379.jpg
1P9A8025.jpg
1P9A7874.jpg
 Commissioned to document World Health Organization’s work in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.  Work still in progress.
 A nurse at a traveling clinic provides HPV vaccinations to 10-year-old girls at a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
 A patient awaits the results of her biopsy in a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
1P9A8189.jpg
1P9A6989.jpg
1P9A7425.jpg
 Patients line out the door by as early as 6:00 at public hospitals in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, awaiting treatment. Many travel upwards of two hours to receive medical attention.
 A doctor at a small clinic in Tegucigalpa prepares a sample for testing to determine whether the patient’s cancer has grown or been eradicated over her treatment. Due to the stigma against cervical cancer widespread in Central America, clinics face difficulties getting patients to return for treatment, leading to an increased incidence of cancer in patients where it could have been prevented.
 A medical team examines the cancerous lesions on a 21-year-old pregnant patient at a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
 A lecture on women’s health and the importance of getting cervical examinations is provided by hospital staff to patients in the waiting rooms every morning.
 Nurses equipped with HPV vaccines pose for a portrait in the entrance to a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
1P9A6723.jpg
 Dozens of samples await testing at a hospital laboratory in Tegucigalpa. A lack of vaccination and access to health education and care has led cervical cancer to rank as the number one cause of death to women in Central America.
 A pregnant patient in the waiting room of the gynecology department of a government hospital in Tegucigalpa. Due to her pregnancy, the patient cannot be treated for her cancer and will have to wait until her child’s birth at which point the cancer can spread more drastically.
1P9A7292.jpg
1P9A8083.jpg
1P9A7379.jpg
1P9A8025.jpg
1P9A7874.jpg

Commissioned to document World Health Organization’s work in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Work still in progress.

A nurse at a traveling clinic provides HPV vaccinations to 10-year-old girls at a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

A patient awaits the results of her biopsy in a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Patients line out the door by as early as 6:00 at public hospitals in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, awaiting treatment. Many travel upwards of two hours to receive medical attention.

A doctor at a small clinic in Tegucigalpa prepares a sample for testing to determine whether the patient’s cancer has grown or been eradicated over her treatment. Due to the stigma against cervical cancer widespread in Central America, clinics face difficulties getting patients to return for treatment, leading to an increased incidence of cancer in patients where it could have been prevented.

A medical team examines the cancerous lesions on a 21-year-old pregnant patient at a government hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

A lecture on women’s health and the importance of getting cervical examinations is provided by hospital staff to patients in the waiting rooms every morning.

Nurses equipped with HPV vaccines pose for a portrait in the entrance to a rural public school outside of Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Dozens of samples await testing at a hospital laboratory in Tegucigalpa. A lack of vaccination and access to health education and care has led cervical cancer to rank as the number one cause of death to women in Central America.

A pregnant patient in the waiting room of the gynecology department of a government hospital in Tegucigalpa. Due to her pregnancy, the patient cannot be treated for her cancer and will have to wait until her child’s birth at which point the cancer can spread more drastically.

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